Banana and Plantain Systems

Bananas drawg
Grown by smallholder farmers, bananas and plantains are major food staples and two of the leading cash crops, both in the East African Great Lakes zone and the West African humid lowlands. Diverse banana cultivars are grown for a number of uses, including brewing (juice bananas), cooking and roasting, as well as sweet dessert bananas. Banana starch, flour, and chips are processed banana products whose markets are yet to be fully developed. Because of its cash crop status, farmers are more likely to adopt high-level management technologies in order to intensify production and yet sustain the natural resource base in the systems. Clearly, much progress can be realized with more profitable and sustainable banana systems.

Since the 1970s, reports of low and declining banana yields have been widespread. Some have attributed this phenomenon to constraints such as soil degradation, pests, poor crop husbandry, and drought. In this project, the hypothesis is that these constraints are, to a large extent, interlinked. Although each constraint can, on its own, potentially cause serious yield decline, the complex interactions between a number of them compound yield losses.

The overall purpose of the banana and plantain project is to enhance the performance of banana and plantain systems within smallholder farms in sub-Saharan Africa.

The main project objectives are:

  • To increase knowledge on ecosystems, social systems, and commodity chains related to banana and plantain production in
  • To research ways to improve profitability of banana and plantain systems in Africa
  • To improve the quality of banana- and plantain-based food products

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